Gardening with Micki: A surprise Christmas gift | News | enidnews.com – Enid News & Eagle

Recently I received a surprise early Christmas gift in the mail. It was beautifully wrapped. It came from a longtime photographer friend with whom I’ve traveled all over Ireland and France doing stories on the European lifestyle. He loves to send me photographs of places we’ve been. So the small gift was quite a surprise.

It was a dainty Amaryllis bulb, complete with instructions. I’ve known about this plant for quite a while. Last holiday season, when I was recovering from a nasty fall in my home, the first hospital bouquet I received was a beautiful Amaryllis in full bloom.

This flower has become as important in the Christmas season as a poinsettia. Fortunately, both flowers have different characteristics and can cohabit in the same home during the holiday season.

Researching commentary for this story, I didn’t real…….

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Recently I received a surprise early Christmas gift in the mail. It was beautifully wrapped. It came from a longtime photographer friend with whom I’ve traveled all over Ireland and France doing stories on the European lifestyle. He loves to send me photographs of places we’ve been. So the small gift was quite a surprise.

It was a dainty Amaryllis bulb, complete with instructions. I’ve known about this plant for quite a while. Last holiday season, when I was recovering from a nasty fall in my home, the first hospital bouquet I received was a beautiful Amaryllis in full bloom.

This flower has become as important in the Christmas season as a poinsettia. Fortunately, both flowers have different characteristics and can cohabit in the same home during the holiday season.

Researching commentary for this story, I didn’t realize that amaryllis bloom in a broad range of colors beyond the traditional red and white for the holiday season. They also thrive in shades of pink, yellow, cream and peach, according to my favorite source, Better Homes & Garden.

They also have clever names: Chico, a red and white flower that looks more like a spider than a flower; Ludwig Dazzler, a pure white specimen; Apple Blossom, white blossoms “kissed” with soft pink touches on the tips of the petals; and Red Lion, a rich pure red specimen on all the petals.

If you want to grow an Amaryllis, here’s what BH&G suggests:

• Before you plant, soak the bulb’s roots in a shallow pan of lukewarm water for three to four hours.

• Choose a pot twice the size of the bulb so the roots have room to grow.

• Fill the pot with potting soil. Insert the bulb and add more soil.

• Water well, but don’t soak the bulb.

• Place the amaryllis in a sunny window. Like nature’s magic, you will have a flower to treasure during the holidays.

At this point of the flower’s growth, the bulb will begin to shoot up a stalk that will be topped with four trumpet-shaped blooms.

After the blooms begin to fade, cut off the stems. If you want it to rebloom, set it outside in warmer weather and watch the magic of an amaryllis revival. 

Micki J. Shelton is a Muskogee native and master gardener.

Source: https://www.enidnews.com/news/gardening-with-micki-a-surprise-christmas-gift/article_c7300a11-306f-585e-8eb3-cc57f28bc513.html

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