Gardening Tips for Early December from ‘The English Lady’ – lymeline.com

Maureen Haseley-Jones is “The English Lady.”

We have been fortunate here in New England to have had the pleasure of a lovely summer not too hot with adequate rain. Followed by a warm fall with more than enough rain into November to encourage healthy root growth for a vibrant spring next year.  I am keeping my fingers crossed that this weather foretells a mild winter – we can only hope, but yet again this is New England.  

Spring Bulbs:

This year due to the warm fall, the soil is still soft and warm for digging, which brings to mind, spring bulbs.

Plant daffodil bulbs in late fall so you can enjoy blooms like these in the spring.

Wear gloves when planting Daffodil bulbs, as these bulbs cause an irritation called a ‘lily rash’. Ma…….

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Maureen Haseley-Jones is “The English Lady.”

We have been fortunate here in New England to have had the pleasure of a lovely summer not too hot with adequate rain. Followed by a warm fall with more than enough rain into November to encourage healthy root growth for a vibrant spring next year.  I am keeping my fingers crossed that this weather foretells a mild winter – we can only hope, but yet again this is New England.  

Spring Bulbs:

This year due to the warm fall, the soil is still soft and warm for digging, which brings to mind, spring bulbs.

Plant daffodil bulbs in late fall so you can enjoy blooms like these in the spring.

Wear gloves when planting Daffodil bulbs, as these bulbs cause an irritation called a ‘lily rash’. Make sure you plant the bulb at a depth of at least three times the size of the bulb with the pointed end up and add composted manure around the planting holes. Daffodil bulbs need to be at least nine inches into the soil below the frost line for optimum bloom. 

Dig a trench for the bulbs and scatter them in the trench.  Bulbs can touch one another without a problem and by planting this way you will produce full dramatic show in spring. 

Plant tulip bulbs 12 inches below the soil surface.

Tulip bulbs should be planted 12 inches down to get them out of harm’s way as tulips are the caviar of the rodent family. I offer a suggestion to avoid this problem before planting by soaking them in an organic deer repellent then allowing them to dry in the sun. This will deter critters from eating them.

Another protection is to line the planting hole with gravel.

In the spring when the bulb foliage is about 4 inches tall, sprinkle more composted manure around all the bulbs you planted. 

 I hear you saying, “Okay Maureen, I’m ready to plant the bulbs but what else is there to do in the garden?”

Folks, there are a number of things to get you out in the garden at this time of year. 

Time for Compost & Construction Projects:

The most important task is to apply a few inches of composted manure on all planted borders with a light layer of natural brown mulch on top. By doing this, you will continue to build the humus component in the soil.

Before the snow flies, any construction projects that you have in mind can be accomplished.

This includes stonework and carpentry, building decks, and mending fences. Building dry laid stonewalls, walkways, patios and digging ponds. Definitely labor-intensive work, but at this time of year you won’t be uncomfortably hot. Make sure to stretch, take breaks and drink lots of water.  

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Source: https://lymeline.com/2021/12/gardening-tips-for-early-december-from-the-english-lady/

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